NAMM: New Analog Mixers From Yamaha

10 to 32 channels at a great price      19/01/03

Buying Choices

MG16-6FX

Yamaha have taken a hold of the budget analog mixer market with their new MG range. Aimed squarely at the user on a budget - eg Behringer customers this range are very aggressively priced. They've kept manufacture costs down and made them in great numbers for economy of scale. The top of the range MG 32-14 features 2x SPX type processors, 8 busses and full-length faders, both mic and line inputs and inserts points on the first 24 channels with 8 stereo channels making up the full compliment of 32. “With increased sales and falling price points of digital mixers in the marketplace, customers looking for small-format analog models often have to sacrifice features,” states Wayne Hrabak, marketing manager, Professional Audio. “The MG line not only goes against that line of thought, but also shows that Yamaha still believes in the viability of the analog format.” From two to a maximum of eight AUX sends provide extended signal routing, while models MG16/6FX, MG24/14FX and MG32/14FX include high quality digital effects sections (two 32-bit SPX-type on the 24/14FX and 32/14FX models). All products will ship in the February through May 2003 timeframe with MSRPs ranging from $139 to $1,250. Input configurations include 4-24 mono channels with three-band EQ, and a maximum of four stereo inputs with either three- or four-band EQ. Higher-end models come equipped with a two or four GROUP and STEREO output buss structure.
  • www.yamaha.com/proaudio


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