String Synth VSTi For Windows

WOK Cromina String Machine aims to replicate the vintage strings sound without samples      12/04/10
String Synth VSTi For Windows


Here's what WOK has to say about the new Cromina String Machine:
No samples inside! After more than one year of development we are glad to present you this physical modeling recreation of the electronic strings sound of the 60s and 70s. Solina, Crumar and Logan were the names, which made it first possible for bands to bring a string orchestra on stage or into the studio. The lush sound of these electronic keyboards stamped many songs of this era. And then an electronic musician from France connected one of those keyboards to a phaser and created the most famous electronic string sound ever.
Two things are fundamental for this famous sound, which also made it impossible to construct a faithful copy with samples:
  • the frequency divider circuit, that gave these keyboards polyphony with the disadvantage of a very static sound
  • the chorus unit to overcome this with a heavy modulation
The soundwise peculiarities of these can not be successful recreated by sampling. So we developed a plug-in with the main emphasis on the reproduction of this typical influence on the sound. Though the drawback is a higher CPU load, it absolutely gives a much better reproduction of the original sound.
Although this plug-in has it's focus on the typical Solina sound (including a phaser and delay effect), it can produce a wide range of typical sounds by using the integrated equalizer, vibrato, envelope variations (including a piano envelope) and other tuning controls.
Pricing and Availability:
39 €. To be released before the end of April More information:

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