New Electro-Dynamic Guitar Sensor

Schertler introduces Resocoil for a fixed installation inside the sound box      10/01/11
New Electro-Dynamic Guitar Sensor



Here's the press release...
Swiss acoustic amplification systems manufacturer SCHERTLER SA has just announced the launch of RESOCOIL, the revolutionary new electro-dynamic sensor for guitar. RESOCOIL is the result of over 10 years research and development by Schertler in the field of contact microphones for stringed instruments. Based on the manufacturer's renowned DYN technology, the new guitar sensor is specially designed to give both a natural and reliable reproduction of the instrument's real sound characteristics.
Suitable for use with western and classical guitars, instruments of the mandolin family and other ethnic instruments belonging to the guitar family, the patented RESOCOIL sensor is specifically aimed at musicians who require a fixed installation inside the sound box, instead of an external solution using adhesive putty. RESOCOIL is also available for banjo in versions for instruments with open back and resonator.
Volume pedal update
Schertler has also announced an update to its volume pedal for use with UNICO and DAVID amplifiers. This latest version includes an insert point on the pedal itself, enabling it to be used together with a favourite external effect. The volume pedal is connected to the insert input of the Schertler amplifiers via a single cable for convenient control of the output volume while playing.
Pricing and Availability:
See local retailer.
More information:

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