Additive / Subtractive Synth

Image Line introduces Harmor      09/09/11
After a year in the making by Didier Dambrin, the inventor of FL Studio, Image Line has introduced the Harmor synth. They tell us that Harmor features a unique and modern additive synthesis engine that emulates classic subtractive synthesis as well, taking sound generation to the next level. Key Features
  • Additive / subtractive emulation - generating sounds not possible with traditional synthesis methods, including the ability to draw custom filter shapes, and offering precise control over every aspect of the sound conception.
  • Image & Audio Resynthesis - allowing a faithful, sampler-quality resynthesis of audio, not a vague sound-alike often met in additive synthesizers. Images too can be imported and turned into sound.
  • Envelopes and articulation - as originally seen in Image-Line's flagship synthesizer Sytrus, are taken to new levels of features, flexibility and GUI integration.
  • Sound creation - possibilities are endless, but not bewildering. Stutter, mangle, stretch, pitch and manipulate both audio and images beyond recognition.
Pricing and Availability:
Introductory price of $99 revert s to $149 on October 1. More information:

More From: IMAGE LINE
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1 Comments...  Post a comment    original story
Adam Bailey    Said...

There are probably soooo many better sounds to demo in this. I mean it looks really exciting to me, but why the dubstep bass? The best version of it uses a single square wave sample. Don't waste your advanced synths trying to mimic the magic of dirty little samples... SHOW US THE GOODS!

11-Sep-11 03:20 PM


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