Geco - Gesture Control To MIDI For Leap Motion

Translation software interprets and maps to MIDI      19/07/13

Geert Bevin - the Eigenharp evangelist has been working on an application called Geco for the forthcoming release of Leap Motion - the 3D spacial control for your computer. The software takes the movement data generated by Leap Motion (a USB device that reads the motion and position of your hands, turning them in to gesture control) and maps them into MIDI data.

Geco works with near zero latency and an extremely low processing overhead so you can pass on your gesture to MIDI destinations of your choice.

Features

* 40 different control streams with both hands
* any control stream can be mapped to MIDI CC and Pitchbend messages on 16 different channels
* instantly switch between related control streams by opening or closing your hands
* carefully designed GUI for an immediate overview of the active MIDI mappings
* real-time low-latency visual feedback of your hand movements and MIDI data
* integrated virtual MIDI port on MacOSX
* connects to any known MIDI output port on your computer
* fully customisable user interface (colours, graphical elements)
* flexible document management that can be loaded while performing gestures
* high performance and near-zero latency engine with virtually no CPU impact when the real-time visualisations are hidden
* MIDI decimation setting to allow integration with legacy hardware that has limited MIDI bandwidth

Leap Motion is poised to ship worldwide with 600,000 pre-ordered units winging their way to be delivered on 22nd July. After that, it will be available in stores like Best Buy.

Geco has been submitted to Airspace, Leap Motion's app store and will be available at the world-wide launch of the Leap Motion Controller on July 22nd.

The introduction price will be $9.99 for early adopters.

 

 

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2 Comments...  Post a comment    original story
Mattsynth    Said...

One thing I always found with hand motion controls is that my arm gets tired when I am on stage doing this for a long period of time. It is because my arm is suspended in air and not resting on a hardware controller like a pitch or mod wheel. I have a Roland V Synth GT and it has a similar function. It works great when I need a quick dose of modulation but for total control it get tiring on my arm. I do see a purpose for this type of controller but not for performing long sets on stage.

22-Jul-13 10:26 AM


Rp    Said...

Im not even sure about the long set thing, iIce owned two 'hand gesture' devices. The beam control on a roland sp808 and a midi fighter 3d, in each instance after just a few minutes use it's, well, uncomfortable. Maybe i just need steroids or the likes but never underestimate the power of something to lean on.

My utterly pointless 2c there

22-Jul-13 07:31 PM


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