NAMM2016: Waldorf Announces Eurorack Gear

Build a system by adding modules to the kb37 controller keyboard      19/01/16

Buying Choices

We will, of course, be bringing you our own videos of all the new gear once the show opens but in the meantime here's a video that Waldorf has posted featuring their new Eurorack gear:

  • kb37 Controller Keybboard for Eurorack modules
  • dvca1 Dual VCA module for Eurorack systems
  • mod1 Modulator module for Eurorack systems
  • cmp1 Compressor module for Eurorack systems

 

This what Waldorf has to say about the kb37...

More and more synthesizer enthusiasts recognize the Eurorack as a huge playground for sound design. Collecting sound modules is like a "fun addiction" where the musician can precisely customize his setup as he goes along without spending a huge amount of money all at once. It's a system that can grow over time into a massively versatile and totally flexible musical instrument.

Our developers came up with a keyboard that is both intuitive for the beginner and versatile for the professional. And it's just as solid and elegant as all our instruments that we build here at Waldorf in Germany.

kb37 is a compact and rugged performance instrument. It can house up to 100 HP of modules in its conveniently angled panel that sits right on top of the super high-quality Fatar TP9 keyboard.

With its high-resolution and temperature stable 16-bit CV interface, it provides extremely flexible control for your modules. MIDI channels are programmable, making the kb37 the perfect partner for both studio and stage.

It provides perfect connectivity to all your modules to serve both the player and the sound designer's desires with an array of real-time control elements such as pitch and mod wheels. The professional, full-sized 37-note keybed transmits velocity and aftertouch.   

kb37 is compact and easy to transport just like any synthesizer keyboard to add style and reliability to your performing rig.


Keyboard & controllers

  • Fatar TP9 37-keys keyboard with aftertouch
  • Pitchbend wheel
  • Modulation wheel
  • Glide
  • Selectable note priority
  • Octave up/down switch
  • Gate retrigger


Module section

  • Width: 545mm/107 HP
  • Eurorack compatible bus
  • Bus CV & Gate linkable to CV interface via jumpers
  • Built-in regulated power-supply (+12V/-12V, 1.5A)


CV interface

  • 8 CV outputs
  • Pitch
  • Velocity
  • Aftertouch
  • Pitchbend
  • Modwheel
  • 3 user-assignable MIDI controllers
  • 3 Trigger outputs
  • Gate
  • Clock & Reset outputs for MIDI sync

 


 

Here's the details on the modules in Waldorf's own words...

dvca1
Built around two VCAs with a wide range of options including the most important one: the ability to musically colour the signal. Starting in dry mode, you get high-precision analogue amplification. But then when you turn the Colour knob, you add a warmer and more colourful timbre to the signal based on a finely-crafted state variable filtering circuit. But there's more: Simultaneous linear and exponential control as well as specialised AC and DC coupled inputs are provided. A positive gain control makes the dvca1 a true "amplifier," and flexible link modes let you create modulated panning.

cmp1
A true high-end analogue compressor not only adds punch to your signal, but it also can be modulated in intriguing and unconventional ways! Side-chaining with a adjustable balance control will open a huge set of modular possibilities. The cmp1 has all the features you expect from a modern compressor including attack and release control, automatic and manual modes, hard and soft knee as well as output gain and bleed amount of the original signal.

mod1
Three different modulation sources in one module make the mod1 the control center of your modular patch. From simple envelopes and LFOs to complex looped multi-stage curves, the mod1 delivers rich and endless modulation options – all based on pure analogue circuitry for everything from super- smooth curves to razor-sharp edges that never sound "digital".
From gently undulating LFOs to ultra-precise hard cuts, you get it all based on innovative analogue circuits for a truly musical touch.

nw1
nw1 is our debut product for the popular Eurorack format. It includes an advanced wavetable engine with independent control of spectral envelope and noisiness – just like Nave. Wavetable scanning is cyclic with optional modulation of travel speed, position, spectrum, and more besides. By providing the worshipped Waldorf wavetable set from the classic Microwave and Wave synthesizers, nw1 will enrich your Eurorack modular system as a potently powerful sound source. The nw1 sound engine also allows for onboard creation of user wavetables via time domain multiple foldover analysis. All you need to do is connect any sound source to the nw1 to transfer audio into a wavetable. Or use the integrated speech synthesizer to translate typed text into wavetables. Wavetable synthesis is an extremely powerful sound source suited to producing all kinds of vivid metallic hues and digital clangorous tones. It can create organic, bell-like timbres, as well as spectacular-sounding scans through various waveforms with truly ear-opening results. It was almost impossible to create these kinds of sharp-edged, digital sounds back before the invention of wavetable synthesis in the late-Seventies. Starting with the wavetable synthesizers of those days, a whole new sound palette left its imprint on so many hit records. Today, with Waldorf's neatly-sized nw1 Wavetable Module, this sound is readily available for the popular Eurorack standard – sounding just as pure, sharp, and massively destructive as it did back in the golden days of digital!

Pricing and Availability:
TBA

More information:

 


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