Comments for:

4-Voice Japanese Synth Emulated
  07-Apr-14
9 Comments...  Post a comment    original story
WorknMan    Said...

How is it possible to emulate an analog synth? Shouldn't you say 'simulate' instead? Not like I'm trying to sound like a grammar nazi, but with video game emulation, there is a VERY big difference. For example, you can emulate a game with a CPU, but you can only simulate a game like Pong, that used discrete circuits. I don't know what that means in practical terms, just that generally speaking, anything analog can't be emulated.

07-Apr-14 06:29 PM


Your mom    Said...

Suck m'dick

07-Apr-14 06:38 PM


Your dad    Said...

Workman - while I'm still trying to figure out why "Your mom" has a dick, the sentiment is about how any one reading your post will feel.

You need to get out more !!

08-Apr-14 09:53 AM


Your brother in rhythm    Said...

I think that WorknMan has a good point worth sharing. Perhaps I should also "get out more" although I'm not sure if that would help this matter.

08-Apr-14 03:15 PM


Christopher Simmons    Said...

Actually, since it appears to be using samples of the JP4, not "emulating" hardware or circuits, I think "simulation" is probably correct for this class of instrument. Or, how about ROMPLERRIFFIC!!!!

08-Apr-14 06:58 PM


WorknMan    Said...

LOL, I knew my post would probably get interpreted that way, but what I was talking about is not semantic, as in 'you say tomato I say tomahto.' The difference between emulation and simulation is rather large. Going back to my video game example, emulating the arcade version of Pacman means you're running ACTUAL the game from ROMs that came off the original hardware. A simulation is sitting down and writing a port to a home console, or whatever. Although you can make a damn good simulation, it would be really hard to replicate it 100% that way. So patterns that you memorized in the real game may or may not work on the simulation.

08-Apr-14 08:40 PM


WorknMan    Said...

LOL, I knew my post would probably get interpreted that way, but what I was talking about is not semantic, as in 'you say tomato I say tomahto.' The difference between emulation and simulation is rather large. Going back to my video game example, emulating the arcade version of Pacman means you're running ACTUAL the game from ROMs that came off the original hardware. A simulation is sitting down and writing a port to a home console, or whatever. Although you can make a damn good simulation, it would be really hard to replicate it 100% that way. So patterns that you memorized in the real game may or may not work on the simulation.

08-Apr-14 08:41 PM


Professor of the English language    Said...

The broadest dictionary definition of emulation is 'Imitation of another'

In that respect this story is 100% correct in its title. What the rest of you are talking about is a specific use of the word in a computer science context. Yes, you really should get out more.

10-Apr-14 06:10 AM


WorknMan    Said...

Of course we're using it in a computer science context. After all, this IS a computer program, said to be emulating an old piece of hardware, which has specific connotations. Once programs come along that really DO emulate old romplers (I'm surprised this hasn't happened yet), how will you designate between the actual emulators and programs like this that are merely simulating analog circuitry?

10-Apr-14 01:33 PM


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