Comments for:

The Art Of Sampling Part 2
  07-Aug-08
12 Comments...  Post a comment    original story
kEyTh    Said...

somehow your time line seems to have mis-included everything Depeche Mode. What a gross mistake if your talking about sampling.. .. Sampling was totally pioneering on albums: Construction Tim Again, Some Great Reward, Black Celebration--- as far as singles People Are People was the holy grail .... did you just forget or do you hate Depeche Mode

09-Aug-08 08:28 AM


Alex Chopelas    Said...

I LOVE the residents! Nice for them to get a shout on a site like this

09-Aug-08 03:34 PM


kEyTh    Said...

and another mistake-- Fripp is NOT on "my life in the bush of ghosts" nor was their really any "digital" sampling--

no need in putting out educational videos if your facts arent correct---

seems like this video is really just someones own recollection as opposed to being actually "accurate" and with a scholarly thoroughness: Talk about tape and tape loops: absolutely discutsing is the omission of Pink Floyd and Dark of the Moon, and most specifically the track "money"-- a ruler was used to get everything all in time as it is... Talk about mellotrons: Edgar Froese and Tangerine Dream.. as well Patrick Moraz when he was in Yes... You mention Fripp in the wrong context, he does belong in this story with Eno but in the TAPE section: Fripp and Enos "No PussyFooting" and "Evening Star" were very important in terms of pioneering use of Tape Everyone used "stock sounds" on the mellotron for the most part-- these guys spent the time to have their mellotrons customized... another overlook but possibly trivial is the fact that a mellotron key held down had only 4 seconds of life before the tape came to an end... a good knowledge of harmony was definitely needed to make these things work as you couldnt just hold a key like on a synth or organ till the cows come home... I believe Edgar Froese and Rick wakeman really had this aspect mastered with these very difficult machines.... and speaking of difficult Mellotrons were very tempermental and difficult to maintain, especially on tour

10-Aug-08 12:50 PM


shekhar dhain    Said...

hmm...this certainly isnt up to the usual sonicstate standards, but then maybe it isnt supposed to be an EXHAUSTIVE guide.

10-Aug-08 06:57 PM


puzzled    Said...

kEyTh....Your point is..?

11-Aug-08 02:54 AM


bonner    Said...

Floyd and DSOTM both get a mention, as do fripp and eno..so whats that guy going on about? Was he pissed when he watched it? As usual this is very entertaining stuff.

11-Aug-08 03:03 AM


mr pink    Said...

Yeah, and Depeche Mode? OK, great band, but loads of bands were using sampling around that time. they certainly weren't early innovators like all the others mentioned here.

11-Aug-08 03:21 AM


Roi    Said...

This video is, unfortunately, rather poorly researched, and oddly biased towards the introduction of sampling into mainstream Hip-Hop, which was very minimal really until around 1985, and even then mainly revolved around the 'lowest common denominator' use of sampling, which continues to sink to new lows to this very day of course, i.e. the lifting of other peoples work from copyrighted recordings.

The first ever use of an actual 'Digital Sample' on a commercial recording was Afrika Bambaataa's Planet Rock in 1982 which uses the Fairlight's famous Orchestra Hit sound 'straight out of the box'. Also worth a mention and produced by Arthur Baker that year, is when he utilised the original EMU Emulator for the voice samples on I.O.U by Freeez, the 1st time the Emulator made it onto a commercial recording.

In 1982/83 Vince Clarke was using the Fairlight system (two of them in fact) which you can clearly hear on the 'You and Me Both' album.

In 1983 Daniel Miller, he of Mute Records/The Normal/Silicon Teens, purchased the Synclavier system which was at the time one of the only ones to have been imported to the UK. This was way, way more powerful than the Fairlight, by the way - the U.S. used to monitor precisely the whereabouts of each unit sold in case they got turned into illegal Missile Control systems!

As kEyTH rightly points out, from Depeche Mode's 1983 'Construction Time Again' album onwards, the Mute Records Synclavier system was used extensively on all Depeche Mode's recordings, and continued to be right up until Violator.

There's an important creative difference to be made here though... DM, Daniel Miller and Producer Gareth Jones were making their own, new and unheard before sounds and rhythms from 'found sound' sources, and not just artlessly sampling sounds or big chunks like verses and choruses from other peoples music, which is how Sampling has sadly ended up being used for by most of course.

They genuinely were pioneers of Sampled sound at that time, pushing the limits of what was acceptable as 'musical content' in Pop music. Also, very few people used samplers at all due to their expense until '85 or so, and when they did it was usually in quite a naff or trashy way.

Apologies for the 'sermon'(I just couldn't let it lie!) but no offence intended to any of you I promise.

12-Aug-08 11:49 AM


lexis    Said...

I can't believe how many people in these comments are just repeating what is either in the videos or in the timeline or in Sonic's Top Samplers series??? "You can type" Woopee.

12-Aug-08 12:10 PM


the eye    Said...

Although the contents of the video is neat the video itselfs it suffers from too fast cuts and FX overuse so I get 'eye cancer' from watching it. Sorry folks, please consider not to have it that brutal flashy way in future - this is NO pleasure to watch instead a real pain.

16-Aug-08 02:24 AM


Kevin Monahan EMU Systems    Said...

"The first ever use of an actual 'Digital Sample' on a commercial recording was Afrika Bambaataa's Planet Rock in 1982 which uses the Fairlight's famous Orchestra Hit sound 'straight out of the box"

Not true. There are several instances that predate Planet Rock. We used the Emulator to add cash register sounds to Everybody's Broke - Magic Windows 1981. The Residents - Tunes of Two Cities was released in Early 1982 but recorded from 1980 - to January 1982. The Residents were an hours drive from EMU and we supported them though the production of that album. There was also Dirty Laundry - Don Henley with Steve Porcaro on Emulator very early 1982.

14-Mar-12 01:59 PM


   Said...

That is Herbie Hancock - Everybody's Broke Magic WIndows- 1981

14-Mar-12 02:02 PM


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