Synth Site: Emu: Proteus 2000: User reviews Add review
Average rating: 3.6 out of 5
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Mike C. a professional user from New York, NY writes:
I find the Proteus 2000 to be remarkably thin and lifeless. there's a point worth making that I haven't seen here yet: The P2K has a processor divided amoung all sixteen (thirty-two?) channels simultaneously, all the time. This means there's no way to dedicate the entire processor to a single sound. This amounts to a very lifeless, fairly bland soundset. Couple that with some of the absolutely worst sounding filters in any modern synth and you really come out broke. All the filters exist solely in software, with what sound like minor variable changes for the different 'types'. Honestly, give me a single good filter instead of countless useless ones. I have compared this module to many other machines, all different sorts in the same price range: A Yamaha FS1R, AN1X, a Waldorf Pulse, a Kawai K5000, and a few higher-end machines like the Roland JD990, Arp 2600, and Studio Electronics Obie-Eight. The simple, undeniable truth is that the Proteus 2000 is unquestionably inferior to any of those machines. The pads are awful. I don't understand how someone could consider them passable. I would suggest that if the pads sound good, listen to the pads on a Wavestation AD or an Oberheim Expander. All of the Proteus sounds are very small, quickly looped samples with a sub-par software filter cycling regularly over them. Not anyone's idea of interesting timberal motion. I would venture to say that - based on the fact that Emu's current crop of modules identical faceplates that an OS-ROM switch would turn one synth into another. Way to go, Emu. I truly feel this kind of equipment discredits Emu.

I suppose as an element on a 24 or 48 track master this could be useful, perhaps with enough outboard EQ to compensate for the stale filters, but with so many other really musically useful choices out there, why bother?

Rating: 2 out of 5 posted Sunday-Apr-23-2000 at 01:21
Adam a hobbyist user from Edison writes:
I own one and love it minus the stupid setup of the effects. What is the problem if someone recognizes your sounds as coming from a popular synth. There are many dance songs which I can tell you exactly where the pad or the main synth is coming from

Rating: 5 out of 5 posted Monday-Apr-03-2000 at 01:32
abc a part-time user from USA writes:
This thing is a serious piece of equipment at a good price, but there are some problems with it that should not be overlooked... The main concern is the FX routing which is a mess. There are 2 FX units which feed to the main outs. Usually, you get to assign a send amount for each MIDI channel, on the P2k you first assign the MIDI channel to one of 4 busses, then you specify the send amount of the bus. I've heard a lot of complaints about this on the p2k mailing list, and it really does make using FX very awkward... I've found myself disabling them more often than not. <p> The other shortcoming I've found is in the sound selection. I heard a lot about the "evolving" pads the p2k was supposed to be capable of and so on...to be fair the pads are pretty good, but they are almost never single note samples, if you play one note, a full blown chord is sounded. And this isn't just the way the preset is set up, the actual waveform itself is made up of multiple tones. I like sampling chords into my sampler, because you can come up with things that you wouldn't otherwise, but I want the option to go with single notes if I want. There are a lot os other samples in the p2k which are cool if you come up with them yourself with a sampler, but you wouldn't use if they are presets in a popular synth... looped breakbeats, horn stabs, Acid House Synth FX etc... The p2k contains a lot of these sounds, that you simply cannot use because they'd instantly be recognized by a lot of people as coming from the p2k... <p> On the plus side, the basses are very usable, so are the drums, and all the sounds are of high quality. But for the reasons mentioned above, I'd think carefully before buying a p2k, it is not the be all end all sample playback synth.

Rating: 4 out of 5 posted Tuesday-Jan-18-2000 at 14:35
Mikael Lindqvist a part-time user from Sweden writes:
1) Sound. Compared to the JV-1080, the sounds aren't as clear but there are much more useable sounds than the JV-1080 have.

2) Editing. Though it's only a 2row LCD display, you can manage to edit sounds but I would recomend Emagic SoundDiver.

3) Conclusion. It has tons of sounds, specificly Basses and Organs, which makes it very suitable for House music. Drums are good but not wow, also if you own a SBLIVE you could dl'd these drumkits for free from Creative Labs (that actually owns EMU).

I'll give the Proteus 4 out of 5, not more not less. I hope that the Orbit and Planet Phatt will come as an expansion ROM.

/Mikael Lindqvist www.mp3.com/oxygenial www.mp3.com/cbl www.mp3.com/notch

Rating: 4 out of 5 posted Wednesday-Jan-12-2000 at 15:40
Game a professional user from Norway writes:
Actually, I was looking for a replacement for my JV1080, something to sit comfortably with my other more analog-gear, so I went for the 2Pk and never regretted it.

It sounds good, especially if your into SYNTH's and not GM-sounds. It's a relief that it's not GM-compatible, that just takes away all the suprises. It's a little bit from all the "old" E-mu's here and it's not a suprise that the sounds vary in quality. But with all those warm-sounding filters and the random-patch function, it's amazing what you can get out of it.

The JV1080 is a nice unit, but it sounds...like a JV1080, and the drums in it is a joke. I bought the Vintage EXp, no drums, not even from their own (in)famous 909/808. You have to buy the Techno Exp. with all the loops(?) and "allready heard before" sounds???

I guess the P2K isn't the bread and butter unit people wanted it to be, instead it's a massive analog-sounding synthesiser, with A LOT of drums.

One thing, the EFX-routings needs imrpovement, that's why it gets 4. When that's fixed, it's a 5.

Rating: 4 out of 5 posted Wednesday-Dec-01-1999 at 05:28
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