Synth Site: Novation: Supernova II: User reviews Add review
Average rating: 4.9 out of 5
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Dirk a hobbyist user from Belgium writes:
Among digital synths that try to recreate analogue sounds this one is my favorite. Compared to my A6 Andromeda it's not bad at all. Very easy to program but also enough indepth possibilities. Third oscillator is a warm bonus to fatten up your sounds. Awesome CS-80s sounding filters (that Vangelis lead sound !) Very reliable and affordable too. Arpeggiator can be stacked and huge 48-note polyphony in pro-x version. Built like a tank. This is also a very good synth to learn to program.

Rating: 4 out of 5 posted Monday-Sep-21-2009 at 12:27
Warren Young from USA writes:
I bought the Supernova II Rack back in 2001 and was very new to wiriting music then...over the years I have learned about different ways to write but one thing is for sure... I'm glad that I bought the SN-IIR its a great piece to have...

Rating: 4 out of 5 posted Friday-Oct-19-2007 at 16:54
Flame_ writes:
Wanted rack 2 loooong time and finally collected 820 euros and found good working unit. Great piece of kit never sell mine because it was hard to find(don't see every day at market). It can make great both trance sounds and nice vintage synth emulations. Effects are sick. Total 7 for every part. I run Roland SH101 thru fx for some nasty sounds. I also love Virus C but SN2 sounds very different and like oscs better and I hate global delay/reverb in virus. Also novation sound imho isn't so 'familiar' than virus (trance) voices. Love mine, 5+

Rating: 5 out of 5 posted Friday-Sep-21-2007 at 15:22
shaft9000 from AZ USA writes:
until the solaris rolls around, and the hartmann neuron is more acceessible, i still haven't played a digital that is both as flexible, lush and bass-ballsy as the Supernova 2. Virus's (filter's too dark imo) & Creamware's are sort of stuck in VA-land the Q is well, the Q - love it for it's characteristic sound but not overall integration and versatility. Nords are too limited in programming and I don't care for their overall bright-edgy timbre. Ion, MS2000 & the rest of the VAs are too emulative or limited to get in the door.

With the SN2 you get the lushness and precise programming aspects of the JDs, adding increased parameter resolution and smoothness. Awesome performance features: 2 pedal & audio ins, heavy mod/pitch wheels, luxury keybed, minimal to non-existent menu diving, 8-part multis/layers/splits w/ discreet FX for each part, 8 banks of 127 programs AND performances, 8 outs, dead-easy excellent 40-band vocoder, blah blah. Its FX section is nearly unbeatable, maybe Kurzweil and Oasys are better quality-wise but not as immediate and performance-friendly. Soundwise it cops Junos, MKS, OBX-a, Synthex, and others very well, but i feel it's at it's best blurring the line between digital and analog. It can sound even more like a D50, SY99 or DX7 at times, only much more tweakable! The SN2's detail, presence and variability in the midrange is very effective in particular. Clear, ballsy pads with graduated smooth, glassy highs and a sub-bass register that likes to be turned up loud. A Korg M/T-series it is certainly not! The highs could perhaps be a little more open in subtractive mode, but the FM is where all that comes through. I've played a few DX's and while i like the overall sound, programming them is frustrating. Imo the SN2 offers a little better full-range sound - while operators are reduced to 3, you can factor in a delicious multimode chorus, comb filter, the 'analog' waveforms, ringmod and LFOs to thicken stuff up a great deal - so i don't feel shorted at all, ever.... Using multis you can have up to 24 operators under your fingertips if desired! Grungy and clean organs, marimbas, Rhodes, bells and stranger-sounding keys abound. The arpeggios are incredible. Infinitely tweakable, and pretty easy on the ears, too.

Rating: 0 out of 5 posted Tuesday-Sep-11-2007 at 16:12
shaft9000 from USA writes:
until the solaris rolls around, and the hartmann neuron is more acceessible, i still haven't played a digital that is both as flexible, lush and bass-ballsy as the Supernova 2. Virus (filter's too dark imo & always sounds processed) & Creamware are sort of 'stuck' in VA-land. The Q is, well, the Q - love it for it's characteristic sound but not overall integration and versatility. Nords 1 & 2 are too limited in programming and I don't care for their overall bright-edgy timbre. Ion, MS2000 & the rest of the VAs are too limited to compete.

With the SN2 you get similar lushness and precise programming aspects of the ole JD-800/990, adding increased parameter resolution and smoothness. If you want an imititator VA, get an Ion or Creamware box. Better yet, get the real analog deal - digital just ISN'T the same, no matter what the magazines and ads tell you. Awesome performance features: 2 pedal & audio ins, heavy mod/pitch wheels, luxury keybed, minimal to non-existent menu diving, 8-part multis/layers/splits w/ discreet FX for each part, 8 banks of 127 programs AND performances, 8 outs, dead-easy excellent 40-band vocoder, blah blah. Its FX section is nearly unbeatable, maybe Kurzweil and Oasys are better quality-wise but not as immediate and performance-friendly. Soundwise it cops Junos, MKS, OBX-a, Synthex, and others very well, but i feel it's at it's best blurring the line between digital and analog. It can sound even more like a D50, SY99 or DX7 at times, only much more tweakable! The SN2's detail, presence and variability in the midrange is very effective in particular. Clear, ballsy pads with graduated smooth, glassy highs and a sub-bass register that likes to be turned up loud. A Korg M/T-series it is certainly not! The highs could perhaps be a little more open in subtractive mode, but the FM is where all that comes through. I've played a few DX's and while i like the overall sound, programming them is frustrating. Imo the SN2 offers a little better full-range sound - while operators are reduced to 3, you can factor in a delicious multimode chorus, comb filter, the 'analog' waveforms, ringmod and LFOs to thicken stuff up a great deal - so i don't feel shorted at all, ever.... Using multis you can have up to 24 operators under your fingertips if desired! Grungy and clean organs, marimbas, Rhodes, bells and stranger-sounding keys abound. Extremely good at string-machine sounds (Omni, Solina etc), and very adept at glowing, detailed evolving pads. The arpeggios are incredible.

Rating: 5 out of 5 posted Tuesday-Sep-11-2007 at 15:58
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