Synth Site: Roland: MC-303: User reviews Add review
Average rating: 3.7 out of 5
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Arjen a professional user from Holland writes:
I would like to send out a warning for potential MC-303 buyers:

I used to have one of these 'funny' silver boxes, and thought WOW! Finally a tweakable

piece of gear for a reasonable price! But how disappointed I was after one day.

The demos that are in the box can fool you quite a bit. It sounds pretty impressive

when you hear this thing first time, but already after one day you recognize the sounds

when U edit your own track on this box. Even worse, I even recognize the MC-303

in vinyl releases! It's not worth the money coz it's merely a sample trigger box

which is just Roland's way to pull money out of people's pockets who are desperate

for tweakability. If you want tweaky stuff, get a second hand Juno1, 06, MC-202, Cat Octave,

Novation Bassstation, Syntecno, or yes.... Even the Yamaha AN1x is better.

Avoid the MC-303...

Rating: 1 out of 5 posted Thursday-Aug-06-1998 at 00:12
JULZ a hobbyist user from USA writes:
The Groovebox is a workstation. No more no less. The midi could definetely be better but in the end it's all about the music. Either you can lay a groove or you can't. For all the people crying about sound creation and creavity buy a sampler and a mic. Being a producer is not cheap so don't expect to get by with just one piece of gear! You get variety from having variety. I've used digital, analog, budget and exspensive pro gear and if you can groove you can groove. The groovebox is a good starting piece and should be followed by a sampler and a software synth (subsynth for keyboard samplers, VAZ or RubberDuck if you have a phrase sampler) for beginning budget sound creation and real analog when you can afford it.

Rating: 4 out of 5 posted Thursday-Aug-06-1998 at 00:12
AARON a hobbyist user from Virginia writes:
The 303 perfect for drum programming and then adding bass lines. Take the time to get to know and you won't be sorry for buying it. Be creative with it. For what you get by not messing around with samplers and the sort it's perfect. It has everything you need to get started.

Rating: 5 out of 5 posted Thursday-Aug-06-1998 at 00:12
John H. a hobbyist user from USA writes:
I don't have, nor have I ever used the original 303, 808, 909 etc.. but I have to say that I am very impressed with how much you can do with this unit. The way it works, with the &quot;parts&quot; all easily mutable or tweakable makes it easyt to use in a live situation. Also you can use the muting and live adjusting features to your advantage by only having to write a couple of parrtens, instead of a whole lot of patterns (wasting memory) for each little change. You can just change it in realtime. I doubt the 303 sounds are as good as the real 303, but I can attest to the drum sounds being exceptionally awesome. I wish Roland made a sampling machine that operated like this one...

Rating: 4 out of 5 posted Thursday-Aug-06-1998 at 00:12
J Walgran a hobbyist user from USA writes:
Bad mama jamma!!!!! Kudos to Roland for packing a ton of power into a very compact unit.

Rating: 4 out of 5 posted Thursday-Aug-06-1998 at 00:12
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