Synth Site: Yamaha: PSR-410: User reviews Add review
Average rating: 3.4 out of 5
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Mather's Studios a hobbyist user from UK (England) writes:
I borrowed one of these off a friend for a few weeks in the summer of 1996 when I convinced myself that any keyboard with 61 full-size keys was a synth. Now, all these years later in the company of a Yamaha DX7 and a Korg 01/w, plus a few others, I realise that this couldn't have been further from the truth. But real synthesizers aside, lets get to my views on the 410...

At the time I was pretty impressed with it's high quality sounds and the built in speakers sounded pretty good as well (I never tried it plugged into a bigger amp), and from what I can remember now, the drum sounds were particularly good - especially the analog kit and the electric kit. (Many of these kit sounds have survived into the current generation of PSR-series keyboards).

My favourite sounds were the strings, the "Pick Bass" and one of the polysynth sounds. I seem to remember that the panel included an orchestrator which allowed you to layer up to four sounds multi-timbrally. You could also split the keyboard as well and have two sounds layered on both sides if you wanted. The keyboard was GM, so I guess that the sounds were based around the basic GM soundset, which is still found on many of the current lower budget PSR keyboards.

Some of the factory drum patterns were pretty good, although I cannot remember the names of them now. I never used the auto-accompaniment, only the drums alone for jamming.

The 410 also had a basic recorder. I think it was four tracks. You couldn't store a great deal in the memory and there wasn't a metronome so it was difficult to program a custom drum track in straight away. My way around this was to record a preset pattern first and then overwrite it with a custom one afterwards. (It is true to say that even the DJX suffers from this propblem). I recorded a couple of basic ideas on the 410 and taped them, but it's not really for serious use - more akin to a musical notepad. Unless left plugged in or using batteries, the contents of the memory will be dumped after a couple of hours.

So, my overall verdict on the PSR-410? It's not a bad budget keyboard at all. Some of the sounds are good and pretty useable, and this makes a great companion for simple, self indulgent bedroom jamming.

Rating: 3 out of 5 posted Tuesday-Dec-17-2002 at 06:28
Mather's Studios a hobbyist user from UK (England) writes:
I borrowed one of these off a friend for a few weeks in the summer of 1996 when I convinced myself that any keyboard with 61 full-size keys was a synth.

Now, all these years later in the company of a Yamaha DX7 and a Korg 01/w, plus a few others, I realise that this couldn't have been further from the truth. But real synthesizers aside, lets get to my views on the 410...

At the time I was pretty impressed with it's high quality sounds and the built in speakers sounded pretty good as well (I never tried it plugged into a bigger amp), and from what I can remember now, the drum sounds were particularly good - especially the analog kit and the electric kit. (Many of these kit sounds have survived into the current generation of PSR-series keyboards).

My favourite sounds were the strings, the "Pick Bass" and one of the polysynth sounds. I seem to remember that the panel included an orchestrator which allowed you to layer up to four sounds multi-timbrally. You could also split the keyboard as well and have two sounds layered on both sides if you wanted. The keyboard was GM, so I guess that the sounds were based around the basic GM soundset, which is still found on many of the current lower budget PSR keyboards.

Some of the factory drum patterns were pretty good, although I cannot remember the names of them now. I never used the auto-accompaniment, only the drums alone for jamming.

The 410 also had a basic recorder. I think it was four tracks. You couldn't store a great deal in the memory and there wasn't a metronome so it was difficult to program a custom drum track in straight away. My way around this was to record a preset pattern first and then overwrite it with a custom one afterwards. (It is true to say that even the DJX suffers from this propblem). I recorded a couple of basic ideas on the 410 and taped them, but it's not really for serious use - more akin to a musical notepad. Unless left plugged in or using batteries, the contents of the memory will be dumped after a couple of hours.

So, my overall verdict on the PSR-410? It's not a bad budget keyboard at all. Some of the sounds are good and pretty useable, and this makes a great companion for simple, self indulgent bedroom jamming.

Rating: 3 out of 5 posted Tuesday-Dec-17-2002 at 06:27
AMJAD MUGHAL a part-time user from pakistani writes:
I M AMJAD MUGHAL FROM PAKISTAN WE NEED A P C BOURD OF PSR410 THE KEY BOURD

posted Tuesday-Mar-05-2002 at 06:07
Rudy Jabroni writes:
This thing is a gigantic piece of junk. If it were a little smaller it would make a great paper weight. Nothing is editable. Although Yamaha has finally succeeded in allowing for people who can't even figure out grooveboxes to create music. If you switch the sounds around on it, it appears as if you've composed a masterpiece. Hahaha. For those of you that wish for instant gratification when you have no inclination of how to program a synth, THIS ONE IS FOR YOU! For those of you with half an ounce of pride, steer clear. This thing is crap.

Rating: 1 out of 5 posted Monday-Sep-10-2001 at 23:43
Amit a part-time user from India writes:
Low on Memory.. No Tracks avbl No Rythm Composer Avbl

Rating: 2 out of 5 posted Monday-Jul-30-2001 at 11:43
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