M-Audio New USB MIDI Keyboard Controller

Radium - a 61-note USB MIDI controller with 8 knobs and 8 sliders joins Midiman KeyStation lineup      14/10/02
M-Audio continue their swift expansion of products by announcing Radium, the latest in their Keystation line of USB MIDI controllers. Radium expands on the Oxygen 8 mini USB controller by giving you 8 MIDI-assignable knobs and 8 MIDI-assignable sliders augmenting its 61-note keyboard. Radium offers users real-time control of any 16 MIDI parameters within their favorite software programs. Five user-definable preset banks extend this control to 80 MIDI parameters of the user s choice at the touch of a button. Radium also has a built-in USB MIDI interface that communicates 16-channels of MIDI data directly with the computer without the need for a separate MIDI interface. Two separate MIDI Outs send data to external gear one from the keyboard and one from the computer. Additional controls include pitch wheel, modulation wheel and octave up/down keys that extend the range of the 5-octave keyboard. The unit can be powered via the USB port or via a 9V DC power supply for standalone operation. "Radium is the logical extension of the Oxygen8", says Aubrey Parsons, M-Audio s UK Marketing Manager. "The Oxygen8 gave users great control over their software synths and virtual studios the Radium allows even deeper and more exciting control. Radium lets you reach inside your software and tickle it from the inside. It s all about flexibility and control." Radium is shipping at the beginning of November at a price of £199.00 MSRP.
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