Portastudio For iPad

Tascam's first iOS app is based on four-track Portastudio recording      10/12/10
Portastudio For iPad


Tascam has introduced its Portastudio application for the Apple iPad, bringing 30 years of easy-to-use home recording to the popular device. Here's what they have to say about it...
PORTASTUDIO is based on – and nearly the same dimensions as – the TASCAM Porta One four-track cassette recorder that revolutionized recording in 1984. The PORTASTUDIO app records four tracks, one at a time, with VU meters and a cassette transport contributing a vintage vibe. When a production is complete, the app can mix your recording to a stereo track that appears in iTunes.
A four-position selector switch assigns which track PORTASTUDIO records to, and input trim and limiting are applied to the input before recording. Audio can be recorded form the iPad's built-in microphone or a microphone plugged into the headset jack. The iPad will record from the built-in microphone if standard headphones are plugged into the jack. Pan, level, high and low EQ are available for mixing, and mixes are saved as CD-quality WAV files inside iTunes.
Pricing and Availability:
PORTASTUDIO by TASCAM is available now on the iTunes App Store for $9.99. More information:

More From: TASCAM
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2 Comments...  Post a comment    original story
DBM    Said...

Aren't there 16 and 24 track apps for around the same price ? Also UI looks like windows 95 ... not in a cool retro way either lol

10-Dec-10 03:29 AM


J    Said...

Yes looks nice, but I saw an sneak preview of a 8 tracker from IK multimedia in the iPad Music/Apps groups on Facebook. It appeals more to me..

http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=313781651056

10-Dec-10 05:56 AM


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