New Hardware 8-bit Monosynth

Soulsby Synthesizers launches the Atmegatron      08/04/14

The Atmegatron is a new 8-bit monosynth and the debut product from London-based Soulsby Synthesizers, who describe it as an electronic musician's dream, combining the sounds of 1980s home computers with the flexibility and power of a modern synthesizer. They say that it adds a wide palette of new sounds to any studio setup and is also great for live use.

Features of the synth include: 32 waveforms, 15 digital filter types, 2 ADSR envelopes, 1 LFO with 16 waveforms, an arpeggiator with 15 patterns and loads of fx including phaser, distortion and the unique Wavecrusher. It also comes with 16 preset sounds and unlimited preset expandability via the Atmegatron Librarian software available for Mac or PC.

The Atmegatron is built on the open source Arduino platform. This means that the synthesis engine can be completely changed by uploading software to the synth. One minute it's a monosynth, the next it's a drum machine. Soulsby Synths will be releasing new and completely free software versions over the coming months, starting off with the the just-released Atcyclotron, a wavetable cycling synthesizer

The Atmegatron is available in two versions:

Atmegatron Complete

  • Atmegatron Synthesizer
  • Power Supply
  • Printed 32 page colour manual
  • Quick reference guide
  • The Atmegatron Complete is housed in a beautiful white aluminium chassis with real walnut side panels.

 

Atmegatron PCB

  • Atmegatron Synthesizer PCB
  • Power Supply
  • Quick reference guide
  • The Atmegatron PCB comes with nylon pillars to keep the PCB raised from its resting surface. The PCB is perfect for programmers and hackers, but is not suitable for outside of the home due to its fragility.


Pricing and Availability:

The Atmegatron is available exclusively online at Soulsby Synthesizers. Strictly limited supply.

Atmegatron Complete - £255 ex VAT & delivery.

Atmegatron PCB - £127 ex VAT & delivery.


More information:

 

More From: SOULSBY

3 Comments...  Post a comment    original story
gridsleep    Said...

Nice DSP simulation of a chiptune machine, for when you want chiptunes without the quirks. We'll need a new category, VC for virtual chiptune. Of course, just as with VA never being a complete replacement for analog, VC will never entirely replace real 8-bit chips.

08-Apr-14 03:48 AM


buntybunbun    Said...

Think you're missing some fundamentals here, gridsleep. All the sounds off any of the chips you're referring to are digitally created and powered by software/code. The Atmegatron uses the Atmega chip much in the same way that a C64 uses a SID chip. The advantage here is that you have a traditional synth interface and don't have to mess around with impenetrable software front ends like you did in the "glory" days of 8/12 bit synthesis.

Virtual chiptune/digital would be an analogue synth imitating a soundchip, not like here which is a digital synth being a digital synth.

10-Apr-14 10:01 AM


GTRman    Said...

TOY

22-Apr-14 10:34 AM


Post a comment 
test
 


More Videos

Sonic LAB: Moog Sub 37 Synthesizer 

A beast of a synthesizer


Cubase Focus: Mixing Workflow with Track Visibility 

More power tips for managing large projects


Presentation: Modulus 002 Polysynth Latest News 

New soundset, sequencer, animator and arpeggiator


Berlin Diaries: KOMA Elektronik Headquarters 

A chat with the new kids on the block